Sprawl

If everyone used as much energy as Americans, we’d run out of oil in 9 years

Unlike gluttonous American industry, Europe's most profitable companies plan to make even more money by getting ahead of this whole peak oil trend.

Cities

How successful cities are like marijuana

In comparison to other crops, the relatively high value of pot is a good metaphor for a city's decision to invest in its downtown versus sprawl, says Joe Minicozzi, the new projects director at Public Interest Projects.

Sprawl

Lorax statue lifted from Seuss estate

Someone stole a statue of the Lorax from Dr. Seuss’ estate. The sculpture, made by Dr. Seuss’ stepdaughter, weighs 300 pounds, so whoever stole it must have been really strong, brought friends, and really wanted the thing. The Los Angeles Times reports: The thief or thieves apparently rolled the statue and stump down a hill and into a getaway vehicle, according to the San Diego police. Who would commit such a heinous crime? Here are our (very, very speculative) theories:

Transportation

Aging boomers who can’t drive will be trapped in unwalkable cities of their own making

Judging by how pedestrian-unfriendly the average American city has become, all our aging parents apparently enjoy being prisoners in their own homes.

Sprawl

Plane commutes on the rise

An increasing number of people are commuting to New York jobs from hundreds of miles away or even the other side of the country, according to WNYC’s Transportation Nation. There are about 4,000 regular plane commuters, accounting for more than 1,000 tons of carbon every week. Has nobody told these people about the internet?

Cities

Trainspotting: Transit vote could bring new life to a gritty city

This summer, voters in metro Atlanta will decide whether to plow $8.5 billion into regional transportation infrastructure. The bigger question: Is a suburban nation willing to reinvest in its cities?

Sprawl

Out of reach: How sprawl jacks up the cost of ‘affordable’ housing

We've poured billions in to low-income housing deep in the suburbs and far from mass transit. The result? Just getting to work and back and paying rent can gobble up half a family's income. Now, affordable housing is getting a facelift.

Sprawl

If people got rid of their extra cars, they could afford an extra house

The average American family owns 2.28 cars, and even in genuinely car-dependent areas they could probably get away with one. How much does that excess auto capacity cost? Enough that if everyone ditched their unnecessary vehicles, they’d save an average of $186,425.03 over 30 years. In a lot of places, that’s enough to buy another house. At very least, it’s more than enough to move to a more expensive area that’s more transit-accessible or requires a shorter commute.

Sprawl

World’s worst elected official makes the case for sprawl

"Well, let me state it unequivocally: I love sprawl," says L. Brooks Patterson, county executive of Oakland County, Mich.

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