Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Sustainable Food

Comments

Target is switching to sustainable seafood

Target is the latest chain to pledge to phase unsustainable seafood out of its stores. The company has already rid its shelves of orange roughy, farmed salmon, and Chilean sea bass, and plans to switch entirely to sustainable fresh and frozen fish by 2015. You sort of expect this from foodie meccas like Whole Foods, which has also been working to eliminate its unsustainable options. But Target supermarkets supply food for a whole lot of busy, less-wealthy suburban shoppers who might not have the resources -- or inclination -- to find out whether their seafood threatens the environment. And it's …

Read more: Food, Sustainable Food

Comments

Food justice — for Navina Khanna, it's what's for dinner

Grist is proud to present the Change Gang -- profiles of people who are leading change on the ground toward a more sustainable society and a greener planet. Some we've written about before; some are new to our pages. Some you'll have heard of; most you probably won't. Know someone we should add to the Change Gang? Tell us why. Navina Khanna.Hunched over a table at an Oakland, Calif., coffee shop, Navina Khanna is talking about one of the most moving moments in a "Food and Freedom Ride" she organized over the summer.  On their way from Birmingham, Ala., to …

Comments

Food Studies: Canvolution!

Photo: Anna ZeideFood Studies features the voices of 11 volunteer student bloggers from a variety of different food- and agriculture-related programs at universities around the world. You can explore the full series here. You've probably already noticed it, but, just in case, I'm here to tell you that home-canned food is hip again. If you don't believe me, look around: your hardware store is advertising sales on big enamel pots and jar lid lifters, and your friends are stocking their pantry shelves with those beautiful glass jars, this one filled with shimmering red strawberry jam, that one with long green …

Read more: Food, Sustainable Food

Comments

Critical List: Leaking New Zealand oil tanker could break apart; EPA to speed Great Lakes cleanup

Eeek. A huge crack has opened up in the hull of the ship leaking oil off the coast of New Zealand, and the ship could break up apart "at any point," according to Maritime New Zealand. In the U.S., the Justice Department had to sue Transocean to force the company to answer government subpoenas related to the Macondo well spill. Can we feed people without killing the planet? Yes, says a new study, but it’ll take money, planning, and eating less meat. The EPA is speeding up Great Lakes clean-up efforts. Offshore wind is doing its thing, trying to get …

Comments

Heritage livestock: Milk ‘em for all they’re worth

A Guernsey calf. (Photo by Tricky.) As heirloom produce gains a growing cult following among eaters, the more under-the-radar interest in heritage livestock breeds may see a resurgence, too. The first National Heirloom Exposition in California last month featured heritage farm animal breeds in addition to the fruits, veggies, and seeds that get foodies excited. Cheese devotees, especially, should take note -- buying and enjoying cheese made from the milk of certain rare breeds of cattle helps ensure their survival. Over on the blog It's Not You, it's Brie, cheese enthusiast Kirstin Jackson collected notes from dairy farmer and veterinarian …

Comments

Would you believe Mark Zuckerberg killed a bison?

Does this look like the face of a man who could kill a bison? Does this look like the DOG of a man who could kill a bison? WELL IT IS. Facebook's Mark Zuckerberg is continuing his yearlong challenge of eating healthier and more sustainably by only eating meat he kills himself, rather than meat from environmentally unfriendly factory farms. And now he's going after the deadliest game. Or wait, no. But pretty big game nonetheless. Apparently Zuckerberg used his own Facebook profile in a presentation this week, and his status said he was cooking bison burgers. Folks were all …

Read more: Food, Sustainable Food

Comments

Food Studies: a constant appetite

Sense of smell class.Photo: Yvonne de Zeeuw Food Studies features the voices of 11 volunteer student bloggers from a variety of different food- and agriculture-related programs at universities around the world. You can explore the full series here. I haven't been hungry in months. I can barely even remember what it feels like. This is because in May I began a masters program at the University of Gastronomic Sciences (UNISG) in Northern Italy. Since then, I've done little except think, read, write, and talk about food. But mostly I've been eating. UNISG, located in the region of Piemonte, is also …

Read more: Food, Sustainable Food

Comments

Cheap date: Take Slow Food’s $5 challenge

Gather your friends for a sustainable, affordable, delicious meal.Photo: Lauren JongSay you want to eat healthy. You even support the idea of a more sustainable food system. But really embracing either might mean breaking out of an entrenched microwave meal routines, carving a big slice out of your budget, or -- gulp -- learning to cook. How about a trial run? That's the idea behind Saturday's Slow Food USA $5 Challenge. It's an invitation to gather friends, family, and neighbors together for a "slow food" meal that costs no more than $5 per person, or around the price of a …

Read more: Food, Sustainable Food

Comments

Farmers who don't believe in climate change adapting to it anyway

In our nation's breadbasket, adaptation to climate change is very much already in progress -- the attitudes of those who represent farmers in our nation's capital notwithstanding. Higher minimum temperatures are reducing yields for corn, which likes hot days but cool nights. So whatever their political leanings, farmers have to adapt or face disaster. And the stakes are even higher than that. The U.S. accounts for half of all corn exports, 40 percent of soybeans, and a third of wheat. Entire nations that are hugely dependent on imported food -- e.g. Egypt -- depend on us for their survival.  The …

Comments

On the road for food justice

The Live Real fellows and staff on the road last month on the first leg of the Food and Freedom Ride.Photo: Hai VoNothing says commitment to a cause like 11 young adults willing to spend several weeks crammed into a 15-passenger van traveling across the country.  Dubbed "from the hood to the heartland," the Food and Freedom Ride is a 2,000-mile voyage from Birmingham, Ala., to Detroit, Mich., intended to spread awareness about food justice issues in the U.S.  The riders are part of a new initiative called Live Real. Director Anim Steel said they're aiming to tackle a variety …

Read more: Food, Sustainable Food