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Tagged with BP

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BP’s Glenn Beck strategy for maybe saving a few million dollars

Both a representative image and a metaphor.

Three years ago, Harvard Law professor Lawrence Lessig wrote an essay for The New Republic, "Against Transparency." His argument was an uncommon one: Political transparency is not an unalloyed good. His core argument is well articulated here:

[R]esponses to information are inseparable from their interests, desires, resources, cognitive capacities, and social contexts. Owing to these and other factors, people may ignore information, or misunderstand it, or misuse it. Whether and how new information is used to further public objectives depends upon its incorporation into complex chains of comprehension, action, and response.

I am not a Harvard Law professor, so I will paraphrase the movie Spider-Man (Tobey Maguire version): With great amounts of information comes great opportunity for abuse.

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Critical List: Northeast cap-and-trade program dropped emissions; World Environment Day

It's World Environment Day -- bring out your green-minded celebrities!

In the Northeast, power plants' carbon emissions fell an average 23 percent during the three years of the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative's cap-and-trade program (compared to the previous three years).

By 2050, Latin American and Caribbean countries could be racking up $100 billion in damages from climate change each year.

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Upsetting photos of oil-slicked turtles from Deepwater Horizon

Back in 2010, Greenpeace filed a Freedom of Information request covering endangered species affected by the Deepwater Horizon spill. They just received a response from NOAA, and it included more than 100 photos. They're disturbing: The ones Greenpeace has released so far show endangered Kemp Ridley's sea turtles, dead and covered in oil.

The photos below the jump are even worse.

Read more: Animals, Oil, Pollution

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Critical List: Fracking fluids reach aquifers in only a few years; Heartland’s weird campaign

According to a new study, it only takes a few years for fracking fluids to migrate from deep in the ground into aquifers.

We know we should ignore this sort of campaign from Heartland, but seriously? Climate change advocates are like the Unabomber??

Could senior BP officials get caught in the Justice Department's criminal probe?

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Critical List: Other countries manage to pass climate change laws; Greenpeace is busy

Plants are freaking out about climate change: Their timing for flowering and leafing is even more off than climate models predicted.

Also, species extinction could be a major driver of climate change and keep the environment from producing awesome resources like ... food.

South Korea's parliament approved a cap-and-trade plan. Kenya and Peru are also working on climate change laws.

A judge granted BP preliminary approval of its plan to settle Deepwater Horizon claims. The company could pay out nearly $8 billion to settle private claims for injury or economic loss from the spill.

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Critical List: EPA official resigns; skeptics think clouds will save us

Al Armendariz, the EPA official who said he'd crucify environmental lawbreakers, resigned.

Two of the last few northern white rhinos on earth have done it. (You know, IT.) No word yet if the pair's expecting a little rhino, but there's a video, if you want to see what rhino sex looks like.

The National Zoo's panda bears were not doing it (not doing it competently, at least) so zookeepers decided to artificially inseminate Mei Xiang. They live-tweeted the operation. Now is your chance to check out the blurry pictures.

BP's first quarter profits were down compared to 2011.

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Ex-BP employee deleted 300 texts about oil spill’s true size

Ever since the massive oil spill at the Deepwater Horizon well two years ago, the Department of Justice (DOJ) has been investigating the spill. And the feds have finally filed the first criminal charges, for obstruction of justice, against an engineer named Kurt Mix who worked on the oil spill. Mix, it turns out, deleted 300 text messages that contained sensitive information about the extent of the spill, just before lawyers were going to collect that sort of information from him.

The DOJ's case focuses on two incidents. In the first, "after Mix learned that his electronic files were to be collected by vendor working for BP's lawyers," he allegedly deleted a string of 200 text messages from his iPhone, the DOJ says. Those messages "included sensitive internal BP information collected in real-time as the Top Kill operation was occurring, which indicated that Top Kill was failing."

In the second, a couple of weeks later, after Mix found out his iPhone was going to be imaged, he deleted another string of texts, this one 100 long, about how much oil was coming from the well.

Read more: Oil

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Critical List: Mad cow disease in California; first arrest in BP oil spill investigation

The USDA found a case of mad cow disease in California.

Federal prosecutors charged a former BP engineer with deleting text messages in order to keep information about the true size of the Deepwater Horizon spill from investigators.

The three cities with the most air pollution in the country are all in California, but L.A. only comes in third. A couple of inland metro areas come in first and second.

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Critical List: Climate bill passes Mexico’s senate; Bill Clinton tells enviros to ‘chill out’

The Mexican Senate passed a climate change bill that's all set to become law. Reuters reports it was "non-controversial." No wonder Republicans are so set on keeping Mexican immigrants out of the country -- they might bring in science.

Bill Clinton has a message for sustainability advocates: “Chill out – sometimes this stuff takes years." (Unless you're in Mexico, apparently.)

Two years after the BP oil spill, offshore drilling for oil is still a risky business.

And BP is still fighting with the government over how much it will have to pay for damages.

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Critical List: Lorax tops box office; climate change worsened Texas drought

Grist is not so keen on the movie version of The Lorax, but the rest of the country is, apparently: The movie topped box offices this weekends.

In Illinois, two cars crashed into a major oil pipeline, shutting it down.

BP's going to pay $7.8 billion to settle Deepwater Horizon claims, according to a settlement announced Friday.

Science says: Climate change made the Texas drought worse than it would have been otherwise.

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