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As the climate warms, New England farming starts to look more like the mid-Atlantic

In this episode of Slow Ride Stories, the crew stops in Lee, N.H., to visit with Carol and John Hutton on their farm. Carol, an eighth-grade earth science teacher, has noticed the growing season getting longer, and she believes climate change is the cause. "Man has interfered," she says.

A hot September last year and a dearth of snow in December meant big losses for the Huttons' farm. On the flip side, says John, he's growing soybeans in New Hampshire -- something that was unheard of when he was growing up. "One door closes, another one opens up."

Watch as Erik and Albert chew the fat with the Huttons, then have an epic race through the corn maze.

Read more: Climate & Energy, Food

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Something’s (not very) fishy about the Atlantic Ocean [VIDEO]

"There’s a strange phenomenon in the ocean this year," says Angela Sanfilippo, president of the Gloucester Fishermen’s Wives Association in Gloucester, Mass. The water, usually cold, has been warm. Lobsters have molted weeks earlier than usual. Groundfish are scarce. And Gloucester Harbor is full of small squid, rarely seen there in normal years.

"This is a true natural disaster," Sanfilippo says, "and it needs to be investigated."

Read more: Climate & Energy, Food

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Did climate change cause the Great Lobster Invasion of 2012?

It has been a banner year for lobstermen along the New England coast, where the harvest has been of epic proportions. They’re probably not getting rich on it, though -- the lobster invasion has driven prices down.

In the latest episode of Slow Ride Stories, our climate-talking heroes Erik and Albert head down to the hahbah in Gloucester, Mass., to talk lahbstah with some of the men who know these clawed crustaceans best. We learn a little about how the critters work, and what locals are saying about the role of climate change in this uncharacteristic year.

A local lobster wholesaler says he’s not convinced that climate change has anything to do with the warmer-than-usual waters that likely led to the bounty this year. A lobster fisherman and wooden boat builder quips, "Maybe Al Gore is right."

Read more: Climate & Energy

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An oceanographer, a marine chemist, and a couple of geologists walk into a bar …

"What if climate scientists are wrong?"

That's just one question that our motorcycle-riding heroes, Erik and Albert, put to the researchers at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution on Cape Cod. In this, the latest episode of Slow Ride Stories, the boys geek out with the PhDs about climate science, climate change, and a little bit of politics.

"Society has been hoodwinked by the fossil fuel industry," says oceanographer Ray Schmitt. "We're putting out the facts, but people think we've got some sort of agenda. We don't have any agenda. We're just saying the climate system is changing -- what are we going to do about it?"

Read more: Climate & Energy

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Swimming in it: An idyllic New England creek becomes a raging menace

When Catherine Taylor-Rosenbaum and her husband David first saw Rondout Creek, they thought it would be the perfect neighbor. A floating dock would make for an awesome summer swimming launch. Neighbors told stories of ice skating in the winter. They bought a home next to the creek and settled in. Then everything went to hell. Since 2005, the creek has risen over its banks numerous times, most recently during Hurricane Irene.

"Everybody seemed to agree, like, this is the future. This is what we're all afraid of," Catherine says. "I just wanted to close the door and walk away from the house. I can't believe that it's not going to happen again."

In this episode of Slow Ride Stories, Erik and Albert get the whole dramatic tale, help the Rosenbaums replace their lost dock, and then get to know Rondout Creek in true summer fashion -- by jumping in.

Read more: Climate & Energy

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Should we talk about the weather? Discussing climate without killing the conversation

In this episode of Slow Ride Stories, Erik and Albert head to Hunter Mountain Ski Resort in the Catskill Mountains. They talk to CEO Russ Colton about the impact of shorter ski seasons on his business, and former lift engineer Scott Berwick about the devastation wrought by Hurricane Irene in his nearby town of Hensonville. Along the way, Erik does some serious stunt narrating and answers the burning question: Why are we talking about the weather?

Read more: Climate & Energy

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Farming on the frontlines of climate change

In this episode of Slow Ride Stories, Erik and Albert visit Cranberry Hill Farm in Ashford, Conn., where proprietor Art Talmadge talks about his business growing heirloom veggies and heritage breed chickens for sale at local farmers markets. Talmadge says he and his fellow farmers deal with climate change every day, but they don’t often talk about it.

Read more: Food

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Talking climate change with the old-timers on the back roads of New England

In this episode of Slow Ride Stories, we join our heroes as they talk climate change with a hot dog salesman named Lenny, who reports that the weather has been “screwy” in his hometown of Otis, Mass. Erik tells us a little about his motorcycle, a sky blue Royal Enfield -- and to get even more of an education, the fellas stop by a Royal Enfield dealership on Enfield St. in Enfield, Conn., where they get the salesman talking about -- you guessed it, the weather.

Read more: Climate & Energy

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Spirited discussion: In a New York distillery, insights on climate change

In this episode of Slow Ride Stories, Erik and Albert visit the Tuthilltown Distillery in Gardiner, N.Y., the first distillery to set up shop in the state since Prohibition. They sample some of Tuthilltown’s fine spirits and talk to Tourmaster Cordell Stahl about how climate change is affecting the Hudson Valley. "Everyone I run across is concerned about it,” he says, “and every, one to a man or woman, feels hopeless."

Read more: Climate & Energy

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Real world: For residents of one troubled town, climate change seems a long way off

In this episode of Slow Ride Stories, we talk to hip hop artist and urban farmer Decora Sandiford about life in the historic river town of Newburgh, N.Y. When it's a struggle just to meet basic needs, he says, climate change can seem a little abstract: "There's no polar ice caps in Newburgh."

Read more: Cities, Climate & Energy