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Ditch the deodorant, save the planet?

A new study brings to light a little-known source of dangerous emissions: personal care products.

The study, published Thursday in the journal Science, used computer models to study how a wide range of stuff people use in their homes, from lotion to house paint, contributes to air pollution. Printer ink, glue, and cleaning products contain petroleum-based chemicals. Even your deodorant may release smog-promoting particles into the air (not to mention your armpit).

Researchers showed that these volatile chemical products (VCPs) produce half of the volatile organic compounds found in Los Angeles. That means that household products may contribute as much to air pollution as motor vehicles do. VCPs help create ozone, the compound that provokes asthma, and PM2.5, super-small pollutants that can cause cancer and lung disease.

It’s hard to believe that a dab of lotion could be as harmful as a gallon of gasoline, but gas only produces carbon dioxide (which causes a whole different set of problems). A full 40 percent of the chemicals in lotions and other personal products float into the atmosphere.

So the next time you’re indulging in some well-deserved self-care, maybe go easy on the products.