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here be data

These maps show what Americans think about climate change.

Darker oranges show where most people acknowledge the existence of climate change, and lighter yellows color where more people still aren’t convinced.

Percentage of adults, by state, who think global warming is happening.
Percentage of adults, by state, who think global warming is happening. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication | George Mason Center for Climate Change Communication

What’s surprising is that the divide isn’t all that extreme. Although there’s some visible difference between the coasts and the middle of the country, some 70 percent of survey respondents across the map acknowledge that global warming is, in fact, happening.

The Yale Project for Climate Communication started making these maps in 2014, a simpler, less what-are-facts-even time. So now, with fresh data collected in the days after the 2016 presidential elections, it might come as a shock that most Americans agree on a few important things.

For example, 70 percent of voters polled believe the United States should not withdraw from the Paris climate agreement, while 66 percent believe we should cut our greenhouse gas output with or without the treaty. A whopping 82 percent of people agree we should fund research into renewable energy. Buuuut … only 58 percent say they are actually worried about climate change.

Percentage of adults, by county, who are worried about global warming.
Percentage of adults, by county, who are worried about global warming. Yale Program on Climate Change Communication

You can explore all the results here.