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lead foot in mouth

Trump’s EPA promised to prioritize communities like East Chicago. How’s that working out?

In short, not so well.

When EPA administrator Scott Pruitt took office, he pledged that the agency would redouble its efforts on guaranteeing clean air and clean water in its so-called “back to basics” environmental agenda. In April, he visited East Chicago, a community of color in Indiana where residents have coped with lead and arsenic contamination for decades, to highlight that agenda.

As the Chicago Tribune points out, the EPA has repeatedly told Indiana Harbor Coke Company that its pollution exceeds legal limits, but the agency has yet to file a lawsuit. “I’ve been told by career staff at the agency that everybody is kind of frozen since Pruitt arrived. Nobody is willing to pull the trigger to enforce the law,” the former head of the U.S. EPA’s Office of Regulatory told the Chicago Tribune. More than 100,000 people live within the five miles surrounding the East Chicago facility.

The company that owns the facility told the Tribune that it’s “exploring a number of projects” to deal with the continued pollution. With proposed budget cuts of 31 percent at the EPA, it may be up to companies to monitor pollution and clean up after themselves. That’ll work.

Watch our video on East Chicago’s lead crisis: