Briefly

Stuff that matters

with a little help from our friends

Reuters/Hannibal Hanschke

Trying to cope with the election? Brexit strugglers share their tips.

In June, the U.K. chose to leave the European Union by 52 to 48 percent. Then, as now, many young voters felt disenfranchised by moves fueled by xenophobia and racism, with dire consequences for the climate. Three-quarters of 18-to-24-year-olds voted against Brexit; less than 40 percent of 18-to-29-year-olds voted for Trump.

Six months on, we wondered if our U.K. readers had tips for their friends across the pond. Here’s what they had to say.

Zainabb Hull, 24, London:

If you’re able to do activist work, go for it. Speak up, fight hatred and oppression, and stand together in it all.

I think it’s going to be a process of being hit by negative news in waves over the next few years … knowing that I have friends to hold onto, to cry with, and express my fears — that bolsters me.

Andreea Bocancea, 21, Gloucestershire, England:

I feel that young Americans should know this, especially those not born in America: that it wasn’t your fault. It takes an extremist measure … for change to happen. The younger generation can only pray we all collectively learn from the mistakes.

Brett Colmer, 20, Bedfordshire, England:

One of my favorite Tolkien quotes from the Lord of the Rings is: “Some believe it is only great power that can hold evil in check, but that is not what I have found. It is the small everyday deeds of ordinary folk that keep the darkness at bay. Small acts of kindness and love.”