Grist staff

Knowing the Cost of Every Thin and the Value of Nothing

The plan unveiled by President Bush earlier this week to make it easier to thin forests in the name of fire prevention has touched off a firestorm of its own, enraging environmentalists who see it as a giveaway for the timber industry and a backdoor out of environmental protection measures. Moreover, environmentalists see the Bush plan as a Trojan horse for sneaking a highly controversial timber practice into American forests — salvage logging, or the selling of trees in fire-damaged forests. Advocates of salvage logging say it is a way for the U.S. Forest Service to make money off of …

Sh*tting By the Dock of the Bay

Ten years ago, delegates attending the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro wrinkled their noses upon encountering the putrid smells emanating from the heavily polluted Guanabara Bay. The summit cast a spotlight on the plight of Rio’s bay and led to the creation of an internationally funded cleanup project. Now, with the follow-up Earth Summit beginning next week in Johannesburg, South Africa, the bay is as filthy as ever. Despite $800 million from the Inter-American Development Bank and Japan’s Overseas Economic Cooperation Fund, some 470 tons of raw sewage are still dumped into the bay every day, along with …

And other words from readers

Responding to “Power Shift,” our special edition on local initiatives to combat global warming in the absence of federal leadership, Grist readers waxed pretty warm, themselves. Ross Gelbspan’s piece on the failure of big-name national environmental groups to take the lead on climate change drew praise from local activists — and criticism from some of the big-name groups in question. Those letters and Gelbspan’s response are below — plus thoughts on corporate climate (ir)responsibility, college activism, and the general attitude of Americans toward environmental issues. Re: The Big-Name Game Dear Editor: Ross Gelbspan is absolutely right that environmental advocates at …

Links related to “Power Shift,” a special edition of Grist

Looking for more info on global climate change? Look no farther. The links below can help you find what you need. General Climate Change Information The Smithsonian Institution offers one of the slickest websites around when it comes to climate change (after Grist’s, of course). This online exhibition on global warming, developed in partnership with Environmental Defense, includes dramatic visual examples of climate change in action and statistics that will shock you, plus games to learn more about global warming and suggestions to reduce your own energy consumption. Climate Change Solutions, a project of the Pembina Institute, provides resources in …

Kristin Casper, Greenpeace Clean Energy Now!

Kristin Casper is a campaigner for Greenpeace Clean Energy Now!. She works with schools, cities, and the state of California to invest in clean energy and protect the climate and future generations from global warming. Monday, 29 Jul 2002 SAN FRANCISCO, Calif I like Monday mornings. As a Clean Energy Now! campaigner for Greenpeace, I spend most of my weekends recruiting new volunteers, getting people to sign postcards, or even powering concerts with our solar/bio-diesel truck, The Rolling Sunlight. The truck has a solar array powerful enough to provide juice for three energy-efficient homes for an entire day. Compared to …

Look for the Onion Label?

It’s not quite like a pie in the face or mashed potatoes on the cafeteria ceiling, but Oregonians can still expect a food fight come November. The state seems poised to be the first in the nation to vote on a labeling law for genetically modified foods, now that the backers of the initiative, Oregon Concerned Citizens for Safe Foods, have turned in enough signatures to get the issue on the ballot. If the measure is approved by voters, few food growers and makers would be left unaffected. The group says the initiative is a consumer-rights measure. Opponents, including the …