Amelia Bates / Grist

Grist Fellowship Program

Want to grow as a journalist while absorbing a universe of green knowledge? Apply for the Grist Fellowship Program.

The Grist Fellowship Program is a paid opportunity to hone your skills at a national news outlet and deepen your understanding of environmental issues. We’re looking for early-career journalists with a variety of skills, from traditional reporting to multimedia whizbangery. We will offer exposure to the leading sustainability thinkers and innovators of our time, real-world experience at a fast-paced news site, and the occasional homemade croissant. Fellows have gone on to land jobs at Mother Jones, The New York Times, Wirecutter, Pacific Standard, Oceana, Greentech Media, The Stranger, and (of course) Grist.

Grist is an independent nonprofit media organization that shapes the country’s environmental conversations. For us, reporting on the planet isn’t about hugging trees or hiking — it’s about using humor and straight talk to connect big issues like climate change to real people and how they live, work, and play.

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Current fellows

Past fellows


The fellows’ fine work

Cheaper electricity, dirtier air? Black communities navigate a tricky relationship with their polluters

Black communities breathe more than their fair share of emissions from nearby refineries. So why are some partnering with their polluters?

For undocumented immigrants, the Trump admin makes fires and hurricanes even tougher to deal with

Dreamers and other undocumented immigrants struggle to rebuild after Hurricane Harvey and the California wildfires.
Grist Explainer

Detroit’s unaffordable water hints at a U.S. crisis to come

The United Nations calls it a human rights issue.
Through the wringer

Techies and tractors: Silicon Valley’s next big thing is saving water

In a climate-changed world, entreprenuers and farmers are coming together to confront scarcity.

A sinking jail: The environmental disaster that is Rikers Island

Flooding, extreme heat, and air pollution plague New York City's notorious jail complex.