Amelia Bates / Grist

Grist Fellowship Program

Want to grow as a journalist while absorbing a universe of green knowledge? Apply for the Grist Fellowship Program.

The Grist Fellowship Program is a paid opportunity to hone your skills at a national news outlet and deepen your understanding of environmental issues. We’re looking for early-career journalists with a variety of skills, from traditional reporting to multimedia whizbangery. We will offer exposure to the leading sustainability thinkers and innovators of our time, real-world experience at a fast-paced news site, and the occasional homemade croissant. Fellows have gone on to land jobs at Mother Jones, The New York Times, Wirecutter, Pacific Standard, Oceana, Greentech Media, The Stranger, and (of course) Grist.

Grist is an independent nonprofit media organization that shapes the country’s environmental conversations. For us, reporting on the planet isn’t about hugging trees or hiking — it’s about using humor and straight talk to connect big issues like climate change to real people and how they live, work, and play.

For our fall term, which begins in September 2019, we are offering two fellowships.

Apply now:

News and Politics Fellow

Justice Fellow


News and Politics Fellow

Are you a curious, self-motivated, hard-working individual who wants to grow as a journalist and storyteller? Do you follow the news obsessively? Check Politico even more than Instagram? The Grist news and politics fellowship may be the opportunity for you.

The news and politics fellow will work full-time, making daily contributions to Grist’s editorial operations including (but not limited to) reporting, research, story ideas, writing, and creative experiments. You will be expected to write quick news updates, newsletter items, and reported stories. You’ll cut through the buzz of the 2020 race to report on the issues and candidates that matter for the climate, both in the primaries and key state elections. You’ll help brainstorm fresh ways of giving context to policy and science news. You will also identify a long-term special project to produce in collaboration with others on the team. We encourage full participation in staff discussions and meetings, seek input on issues large and small, and promise to laugh politely (or heartily, depending on the circumstances) at all your jokes.

The news and politics fellow can elect to work out of Grist’s downtown Seattle office or work remotely from anywhere in the country. (If you choose the former, please tell us in your cover letter how you’d approach news coverage from the sleepy West Coast. If you choose the latter, you can work in your PJs, but you’ll probably have to bake your own croissants.) Fellow must make a six-month commitment. The fellowship pays $2,750 per month. In special cases the fellowship will be renewable once by mutual agreement between the fellow and Grist. Renewal candidates will be considered alongside the applicant pool for the next fellowship cycle.

We are looking for early-career journalists, reporters, and editors. Candidates are most likely college or j-school grads with some experience in journalism. Our primary subject areas are climate, politics, clean energy, sustainable food, livable cities, environmental justice, and a carbon-free economy. (Note: If justice is your thing, check out the justice fellowship below.)

THE APPLICATION

Applicants must submit the following in one PDF attachment:

  1. Resume and cover letter. We are looking for a succinct, thoughtful cover letter that displays your qualifications, enthusiasm, and communication style.
  1. Write a short news post. Identify something that’s happening in the news and write a brief story for Grist. Try to take a sharp angle on the news of the day or think up a smart way of making the news digestible. Please include any relevant links to news sources and background info. The brief should be about 200-300 words. Please include a link to an image or video that you would run with the story. (Note: We do not intend to publish this assignment, so don’t worry about whether you have the rights to the image or video.)
  1. Pitch a mini-feature. Pitch a story based on something happening in the news, a story that might run 400-1,000 words in length. The story could be a profile, an explainer, a reported news story. Pitch should be a brief paragraph and a list of sources you’d interview.
  1. Pitch: What’s your big idea? What aspect of the environmental/sustainability story are you passionate about covering? How would you explore that passion in the form of a deep-dive story for Grist? Please specify how you would approach the story, including target sources, length and format, potential angle, multimedia aspects, etc. Pitch should be no longer than 300 words.
  1. Three samples of your work. Writing samples can be newspaper or magazine clips, blog posts, or unpublished pieces. We will gladly accept links to multimedia samples (video, illustration, infographic, podcast, etc.), but cannot review original files.

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

Applications should be emailed to fellowships@grist.org. Please include “News and Politics Fellow” in the subject line. Please include all materials in one PDF attachment. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

For fellowships that begin September 2019, please submit applications by July 15, 2019.

No phone calls, please and thank you.

Grist is an equal-opportunity employer.


Justice Fellow

Are you an early-career journalist looking to develop your voice, tell compelling stories about underserved people and communities, and work at a news shop that’s making a difference? Are you obsessed with justice for all? Then the Grist environmental justice fellowship may be the opportunity for you.

With the mentorship and support of Grist’s editorial staff, the justice fellow will report on the connections between social inequality and the environment. You will explore the ways in which the environmental movement can become more inclusive — especially in the current moment — and how communities of color are developing new ways to fight for cleaner air and water, as well as safer neighborhoods. The strongest applicants will understand (or quickly glean) the difference between journalism and advocacy — and be able to include marginalized voices to showcase a more complete narrative around environmental and climate issues. We’re especially interested in journalism that identifies communities and people working on home-grown solutions. You will be expected to write quick news updates and newsletter items, reported stories, and one mini-feature a month. You will also identify a long-term special project to produce in collaboration with others on the team.

The justice fellow will be part of our larger fellowship program, a six-month career development program for journalists. We will encourage full participation in staff discussions and meetings, seek input on issues large and small, and give you a custom emoji in Slack (it’s true!).

The justice fellow can elect to work out of Grist’s Seattle office or work remotely from anywhere in the country. If you work remotely, you will be encouraged to report on stories in and around your home community. The fellowship pays $2,750 per month. In special cases, the fellowship will be renewable once by mutual agreement between the fellow and Grist. Renewal candidates will be considered alongside the applicant pool for the next fellowship cycle.

We are looking for early-career writers, reporters, and editors. Candidates are most likely college or j-school grads, with some experience in journalism.

THE APPLICATION

Applicants must submit the following in one PDF attachment:

  1. Resume and cover letter. We are looking for a succinct, thoughtful cover letter that displays your communication style and why you’re the right person for the justice beat.
  1. Write a short news post. Identify something that’s happening in the news and write a brief story for Grist. Try to take a sharp angle on the news of the day or think up a smart way of making the news digestible. Please include any relevant links to news sources and background info. The brief should be about 200 words. Please include a link to an image or video that you would run with the story. (Note: We do not intend to publish this assignment, so don’t worry about whether you have the rights to the image or video.)
  1. Pitch a story about a community that’s doing model work. Pick a community that’s working on home-grown solutions and tell us how you would approach a story about this community. Pitch should be a brief paragraph.
  1. What’s your big idea? What aspect of environmental justice are you passionate about covering? How would you explore that passion in the form of a deep-dive story for Grist? Please specify how you would approach the story, including target sources, length and format, potential angle, multimedia aspects, etc. The pitch should be no longer than 300 words.
  1. Three samples of your work. Writing samples can be newspaper or magazine clips, blog posts, or unpublished pieces. We will gladly accept links to multimedia samples (video, illustration, infographic, podcast, etc.), but cannot review original files.

SUBMISSION INSTRUCTIONS

Applications should be emailed to fellowships@grist.org. Please include “Justice Fellow” in the subject line. Please include all materials in one PDF attachment. Incomplete applications will not be considered.

For fellowships that begin September 2019, please submit applications by July 15, 2019.

No phone calls, please and thank you.

Grist is an equal-opportunity employer.


Current fellows

Past fellows


The fellows’ fine work

Cheaper electricity, dirtier air? Black communities navigate a tricky relationship with their polluters

Black communities breathe more than their fair share of emissions from nearby refineries. So why are some partnering with their polluters?

For undocumented immigrants, the Trump admin makes fires and hurricanes even tougher to deal with

Dreamers and other undocumented immigrants struggle to rebuild after Hurricane Harvey and the California wildfires.
Grist Explainer

Detroit’s unaffordable water hints at a U.S. crisis to come

The United Nations calls it a human rights issue.
Through the wringer

Techies and tractors: Silicon Valley’s next big thing is saving water

In a climate-changed world, entreprenuers and farmers are coming together to confront scarcity.

A sinking jail: The environmental disaster that is Rikers Island

Flooding, extreme heat, and air pollution plague New York City's notorious jail complex.