Huffington Post Investigative Fund

The Huffington Post Investigative Fund is an independent, nonprofit journalism venture based in Washington, D.C.

EPA’s failure to publicize drinking water data prompts rethinking in agency, Congress

This story was written by Danielle Ivory. There is some evidence that Congress — and the Environmental Protection Agency — are rethinking their policies on a commonly used weed-killer after disclosures that the EPA failed to notify the public about high levels of the herbicide in drinking water. As the Investigative Fund revealed last week, the herbicide atrazine has been found at levels above the federal safety limit in drinking water in at least four states. The chemical has been studied for its potential link to breast cancer, prostate cancer, and birth defects, and the EPA considers it to be …

Herbicide maker asks that lobbying be excluded from class action lawsuit

This story was written by Danielle Ivory. Lawyers representing the maker of the herbicide atrazine are asking that documents related to the company’s lobbying and trade association activities be excluded from a class action lawsuit being filed by some Illinois water utilities. As the Investigative Fund reported last week, many utilities say they cannot afford expensive carbon filters that would remove atrazine from public drinking water. They are going to court to try to force the Swiss chemical company Syngenta to pay for installing such filtering systems. In an interview today, the lawyer for Syngenta Crop Protection Inc., Kurt Reeg, …

weeding out weed killer

Water utilities lack proper filters for weed-killer

This story was written by Danielle Ivory. Results from a federal drinking water monitoring program show that many public water companies are ineffective at removing a widely used weed-killer from their water supplies. As the Huffington Post Investigative Fund reported earlier this week, the Environmental Protection Agency has failed to notify the public about data showing that the herbicide atrazine has been found at levels above the federal safety limit in drinking water in at least four states. But that data also reveals that many public water filtration systems are not removing the herbicide. In many places, atrazine levels in …