Josh Freed

Joshua Freed is the Vice President of the Clean Energy Program at Third Way. He focuses on the policies and strategies needed to bring about clean energy reform and to address climate change.

Now's not the time to hide from cleantech's challenges

In October, Third Way raised alarms that a decline in early stage venture capital investment in clean energy technologies threatened America’s ability to compete in the $2.3 trillion global clean energy market. Some in the clean energy community dismissed this warning, citing the massive growth of wind and solar capacity in the United States over the past 10 years. Others challenged the importance of early stage investments. They interpreted the decline in funding for new start-ups as a sign that investors were simply shifting their capital into cleantech companies that were nearing their initial public offerings. As long-time advocates of …

Conservatives, media missing the boat on clean energy

Demand for energy resources in the rest of the world, and especially developing nations, is growing rapidly. Like Willie Sutton robbing banks because “that’s where the money is,” emerging economic powers like China and India are racing to secure the oil, coal, and natural gas they use because that’s where the economic growth is. But as this competition for limited fossil fuel resources heats up, the media and conservative politicians are increasingly questioning federal investments in clean energy. Using selective facts and a very narrow definition of national interest, they argue that public incentives for clean energy are a bad …

Why a clean energy standard is smart policy and smart politics in 2011

Last year, the Senate stiff-armed every important clean energy idea that crossed its path. Cap and trade. Oil drilling reform. Even a clean energy bank. This was more than a one-year or one Congress set back. It has created a growing perception that energy reform is legislative poison. With fewer clean energy advocates in the Senate and a Republican-controlled House, prospects for reform would appear even dimmer for 2011. But with energy use increasing, new power plants being put on the drawing board and China aggressively pursuing clean energy and its $2 trillion payday, the United States cannot sit on …