Tagged with BPA

I Learned of Misfit Toys

Toxic toys and BPA-exposed babies, just in time for the holidays

Dearests, in this season of love and laughter, when we all become young at heart and so forth, I’m going to point out two new child-related studies that might just make you — well, choke on your egg nog. Luckily, I’ve also found some handy resources that will keep your holidays happy. Cute — but toxic, according to new tests.Courtesy HealthyStuff.orgShop smart for your kids, or not at all: A test of 700 toys spearheaded by HealthyStuff.org found toxic chemicals in a third of them, including lead, cadmium, and mercury. The word you’re looking for is: Yikes! There’s some good …

BPA Babies and Cash Registers

We’ve known for a long time that bisphenol-A (BPA) is bad for us. Study after study shows the ill-effects of this widely-used industrial chemical on our bodies–and in particular, on developing babies’ bodies. The list is pretty sobering: BPA’s been linked to breast cancer in women, brain damage in children, obesity, heart disease, diabetes… Two new studies add to the litany: One study suggests that BPA, may cause sexual dysfunction in men. Another study, reported in Science News, links BPA exposures in early pregnancy to more aggressive behavior in 2-year old girls and more anxious and withdrawn 2-year old boys. …

Oh Rats

While scientists fight over BPA studies, Congress could just act

Joining Tom Philpott on the anti-BPA bandwagon, the New York Times columnist Nick Kristof had an op-ed Sunday detailing the mounting evidence against the hormone disrupting chemical. One comment in particular summed up the debate nicely: “When you have 92 percent of the American population exposed to a chemical, this is not one where you want to be wrong,” said Dr. Ted Schettler of the Science and Environmental Health Network. “Are we going to quibble over individual rodent studies, or are we going to act?” One of the problems we face when it comes to regulating toxic substances is that …

Two words: endocrine disruptor

Consumer Reports finds BPA traces in common canned foods

Bisphenol A, commonly abbreviated as BPA, is vile stuff–not the kind of thing a smart species knowingly introduces into its ecosystem. And if a species were to willfully foul its nest with BPA, it would at least be wise to keep it out of direct contact with food. That’s because BPA is an established endocrine disruptor. In June, the Endocrine Society relased a statement warning of the health threat presented by BPA. According to the statement, low-level exposure to BPA adversely affects male and female reproduction, thyroid function, metabolism, and could increase obesity. Unhappily, our species hasn’t seen fit to …

Bring It On

Ask Umbra on her hotness, corporate gift baskets, and more

Send your question to Umbra! Q. Dear Umbra, I am worried that your hotness may be contributing to global warming. I’m not sure what can be done to fix this. O Zone A. Dearest O, You are making me blush. But I am using your letter as a springboard to report some exciting news: In an effort to make my operations more energy-efficient, I am combining my previous twice-weekly column into one weekly, multi-question column. Experts say the shift will result in 26 fewer milligrams of carbon emitted each week. I’ll also be popping up in other places on Grist …

Umbra on Camelbaks

Dear Umbra, Recently, I’ve started to try to avoid plastics (especially plastic water bottles). For Christmas, my brother gave me a Camelbak-type water bottle. How safe is this? I assume it’s as bad as most plastic water bottles. Timothy Kearney Issaquah, Wash. Dearest Timothy, Gifting quandary alert. But does it suck? Photo: iStockphoto Not all plastic water bottles are equal. In a larger context of avoiding plastic, we may occasionally find ourselves with a plastic bottle that is handy and use it for a while. There are certain exceptions: We should try to completely avoid polyvinyl chloride, PVC, which is …

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