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Articles by Ralph Loglisci

Ralph Loglisci is a project director at the Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, based at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Loglisci currently directs the Johns Hopkins Healthy Monday Project, which focuses on food and health behavior change communication research, and he writes for the Livable Future Blog. Loglisci has worn many hats over the years and writes about issues ranging from food politics to obesity and health behavior. He was the communications director for the Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production and the Berman Institute of Bioethics. Before that Ralph spent almost 15 years as an Emmy Award-winning broadcast journalist.

Featured Article

The editors of Scientific American recently encouraged U.S. hog farmers to “follow Denmark and stop giving farm animals low-dose antibiotics.” Sixteen years ago, in order to reduce the threat of increased development of antibiotic resistant bacteria in their food system and the environment, Denmark phased in an antibiotic growth promotant ban in food animal production. Guess what? According to Denmark’s Ministry of Food, Agriculture and Fisheries the ban is working and the industry has continued to thrive. The government agency found that Danish livestock and poultry farmers used 37 percent less antibiotics in 2009 than in 1994, leading to overall reductions of antimicrobial resistance countrywide.

Except for a few early hiccups regarding the methods used in weaning piglets, production levels of livestock and poultry have either stayed the same or increased. So how did Danish producers make this transition, and why isn’t the U.S. jumping to follow suit? Like many things in industrial agriculture, the answer is not clear.

If any country knows how to intensively produce food animals, particularly pigs, it is Denmark. In 2008, farmers p... Read more