Skip to content

Articles by Rob Perks

Rob Perks runs NRDC's Center for Advocacy Campaigns. He started at NRDC in the legislative program handling media relations, and up until the fall of 2005 managed the popular and effective 'Bush Record' project. He left to build the Outreach & Communications department at American Rivers before returning to NRDC in the spring of 2007. During his 15-year environmental career, he has led campaigns in Florida for U.S. Public Interest Group; organized the grassroots for the Chesapeake Bay Foundation in Virginia; directed national field operations for Public Employees for Environmental Responsibility (PEER); and served as the youngest-ever executive director of the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation in North Carolina.

Featured Article

“If you take change from the offering plate …” (because you can’t afford your energy bills).Photo: Anirudh KoulCross-posted from the Natural Resources Defense Council.

In the wake of an extreme heat wave that overtook Washington, D.C., the past few weeks, spring has sprung back with some blessedly mild weather. But the wild weather has been even worse in other parts of the country, where many people are still suffering from the effects of hard winds, high waters, and high temperatures that scientists warn could be harbingers of the new normal due to climate change.

It’s hard for me to fathom how naysayers still refuse to acknowledge that increased carbon pollution — primarily from the burning of fossil fuels — is to blame for the increasingly hostile weather we’re facing these days. After all, climate scientists have been warning us for years that global warming will bring more extreme storms, as well as more rain in some places and more drought in others. What’s it gonna take for the climate change deniers to accept that we have a climate problem that needs fixing? This is a serious question, but perhaps humor... Read more

All Articles

  • Breaking: The Republican attack on clean air isn’t popular

    Cross-posted from the Natural Resources Defense Council. Make no mistake about it: The Clean Air Act is under attack from Congress. Indeed, in the U.S. Senate voting is imminent on several amendments to a non-related small business bill that would ditch, delay, or dilute the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s ability to update and enforce air pollution standards. […]