Claire Thompson

Claire Thompson used to be Grist's editorial assistant. After disappearing into the wild for a while, she is now attempting to reenter society.

Politics

Seattle picks its next mayor — but will the Emerald City get greener?

In Seattle, being green-minded is practically a prerequisite for running for office. The choice this year is between a scrappy (and prickly) people's candidate and a slick, business friendly political veteran.

Business & Technology

Coal shoulder: BLM sells controversial coal mining lease, but no one’s buying

Wyoming's Bureau of Land Management held a sale for the lease of 148 million tons of coal that received not a single bid, a first in state history.

Climate & Energy

By 2050, flooding could cost the world’s coastal cities over $60 billion a year

That’s only if cities make significant investments to mitigate risk. If we do nothing, flooding costs could soar to $1 trillion.

Business & Technology

Tesla Model S rocks safety tests, gets highest possible score

The sexiest car on the market has now officially been deemed the safest. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration gave top marks to the Tesla sedan.

Climate & Energy

Fracking frenzy slows as oil and gas assets plummet in price

Shale assets are worth less and less thanks to an oversaturated market and production that hasn’t always lived up to expectations.

Business & Technology

Your iPhone uses more electricity than your fridge

A new report sheds light on the massive energy footprint of the global digital economy.

Climate & Energy

The White House goes solar — again

The move comes three decades after Jimmy Carter put solar panels on the White House roof, and three years after the Obama administration promised to do the same.

Business & Technology

A win-Winco situation: Grocery chain treats employees well and has low prices

Boise, Idaho-based WinCo could teach Walmart a thing or two. And the regional grocery-store chain is expanding.

Climate & Energy

A royal(ty) scam: How oil and gas companies shortchange landowners

Energy companies work the system so that landowners who lease drilling rights to their property rarely see royalties as high as expected.

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