Ted Glick

Ted Glick is the national policy director for the Chesapeake Climate Action Network. Past writings and more information can be found here.

Revolution in the air

“Those Who Take the Meat from the TableTeach contentment.Those for whom the taxes are destinedDemand sacrifice.Those who eat their fill speak to the hungryOf wonderful times to come.Those who lead the country into the abyssCall ruling too difficultFor ordinary men and women.”-Bertolt Brecht I first heard about the “people’s microphone” technique during the November, 1999 demonstrations against the World Trade Organization in Seattle. I remember reading about how, when 400 people were demonstrating outside the jail where global justice activists were being held, the method of communication was by people repeating the words of the person speaking, without sound amplification, …

The Occupy Movement, winning victories and November 6

I haven’t felt like this since Seattle and the birth of the global justice movement in the USA 12 years ago.  Because of the Occupy Wall Street action and the astounding growth of similar local occupy actions all over the country, the political winds have changed in the USA, all within less than a month. Hope is in the air, and hope is a powerful thing. Revolutions don’t happen unless masses of people believe that it is possible for change to really happen. And revolutions usually don’t follow a neat script. I’m reminded of something that the late Arthur Kinoy …

First Ozone Standards, Now This?

I woke up this morning wondering if my ears had deceived me. I didn’t remember hearing anything in Obama’s speech last night about clean energy investments or clean energy jobs. So I looked up the transcript and went through it.   It turns out Obama did say something along these lines. One thing, one part of a sentence. Here it is:   If we provide the right incentives, the right support — and if we make sure our trading partners play by the rules — we can be the ones to build everything from fuel-efficient cars to advanced biofuels to …

The Tar Sands Action (smile)

  My mind has been a jumble the last couple of days as I’ve tried to think about what I would be saying in this column. I knew I would be writing about the historic and amazing Tar Sands Action in Washington, D.C.   I am literally smiling as I embark on this writing journey. There was so much positive energy, so many wonderful experiences, so much hope for the future in and around the two weeks of sitting-in and standing-in in front of the White House, August 20-September 3.   One of the things I will never forget is …

Finish Strong at the White House September 3!

The actions against the Keystone XL pipeline down at the White House are a wonderful thing. Over the last five days 275 people have gotten arrested. When the police/whomever else tried to intimidate our movement by holding Bill McKibben and 52 others for two days and nights in pretty abysmal jail conditions over the weekend, we didn’t back down an inch, just kept coming. This is not just historic, it’s a real measure of something very significant, something about our toughness, our dedication, our unity, our morale, happening with the climate movement. September 3 is another important test. Saturday, September …

Climate Change

Tar-sands protesters in jail longer than expected

Despite assurances from the police that tar-sands-pipeline protestors would get just a few hours in jail, they're now being locked up for 48 hours or more.

Mass Movements in the USA Today

What does it take to build a popular movement that has a chance of succeeding in its objectives? I thought about this a good bit during my recent vacation in the West Virginia mountains. I’ve been personally involved in several mass movements over the course of my adult life: the draft resistance and anti-Vietnam war movements in the late 60s and early 70s; the very short, very small, but very successful mass movement to impeach/remove President Richard Nixon in 1973-74; the 1980’s Rainbow Coalition movement; the third party movement of the 90’s; the global justice movement in the first years …

Tropic of Chaos: a book review

“Between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer lies what I call the Tropic of Chaos, a belt of economically and politically battered post-colonial states girding the planet’s mid-latitudes. In this band, around the tropics, climate change is beginning to hit hard. The societies in this belt are heavily dependent on agriculture and fishing, thus very vulnerable to shifts in weather patterns … In this belt we find clustered most of the failed and semi-failed states of the developing world.”   p. 9 Christian Parenti has written a book about climate change, “Tropic of Chaos: Climate Change and the …

Youth and Positive Social Change

“That which touches me most is that I had a chance to work with peoplePassing on to others that which was passed on to meTo me young people come first, they have the courage where we failAnd if I can but shed some light as they carry us through the galeThe older I get the better I know that the secret of my going onIs when the reins are in the hands of the young who dare to run against the stormNot needing to clutch for power, not needing the light just to shine on meI need to be one …

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