Wayne Curtis

Wayne Curtis is a contributing editor at The Atlantic magazine, where he writes a bi-monthly column about cocktail culture, as well as articles on topics such as travel and architecture. He's also a contributing editor at Preservation magazine (published by the National Trust for Historic Preservation), and has written for numerous others, including the New York Times, Smithsonian, American Scholar, Saveur, Men's Journal, Yankee, American Archeology, and This American Life. He's the author of And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the New World in 10 Cocktails (Crown, 2006), and 2002 he was named Lowell Thomas Travel Journalist of the Year. He's lived in New Orleans since 2006.

Now that's Italian!

Reinventing the supermarket: How New York’s Eataly falls short

Eataly is nice, but there’s still plenty of room left to reinvent the supermarket.Photo: Samantha DeckerThe American supermarket experience hasn’t changed much in a half century. It’s basically a connect-the-dots problem each consumer solves differently: …

On moving to New Orleans, a city defined by water

Wayne Curtis is a freelance writer who’s written for The New York Times, Atlantic Monthly, American Scholar, Preservation, and American Heritage, and is the author of And a Bottle of Rum: A History of the …

A controversial New Orleans landfill is set to close, but eco-disaster still looms

 The logistics of cleaning up New Orleans in the wake of Hurricane Katrina are almost beyond comprehension. Louisiana’s Department of Environmental Quality says some 15,000 houses are slated to be torn down, and demolition is …

Community forests help revitalize New England towns

Beyond a set of granite gates on a hillside in Rumford, Maine, a lost city sits amid silver maples and oaks, just across the river from a sprawling paper mill. It’s called Strathglass Park, and …

Maine woods emerge as ground zero for a grand land conservation experiment

Try this little-known fact on for size: Approximately one-quarter of New England — a region first settled four centuries ago — is almost entirely undeveloped. Never mind images of East Coast overcrowding and sprawl; travel …

Atlantic salmon are even worse off than their Pacific cousins

To catch an Atlantic salmon in the Machias River back in the 1940s — and we’re talking a legitimate salmon here, maybe 30 or 40 pounds — didn’t require a knack with rod and reel, …

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