Business & Technology

She's redefining green

Valerie Casey

Art by Nat Damm. Original photo by Brian Smale. Valerie Casey Founder, Designers Accord Oakland, Calif. Designer Valerie Casey, 37, wants to green not just her own projects but her entire industry. She started the Designers Accord—aka the “Kyoto Treaty of Design”—in 2007 to encourage the creative community to integrate the principles of sustainability into all design practice and to share knowledge with each other. So far, she estimates, more than 600 design firms, 30 corporations, and dozens of colleges and universities from more than 100 countries have ratified the accord. It all started in 2007 with a manifesto Casey …

He's redefining green

Robert Cialdini

Art: Nat Damm Robert Cialdini Psychologist Tempe, Ariz. Robert Cialdini, 64, until recently a psychology and marketing professor at Arizona State University, wrote Influence, the classic book on persuasion. Lately he’s been researching the best ways to persuade people to save energy. In 2007, he coauthored a study [PDF] that found that giving people info about neighborhood energy-use norms (combined with smiley faces) led to large home energy savings. His research inspired the creation of the company Opower, which sells software that utilities can use to make smarter bills and inspire energy efficiency. Cialdini now serves as chief scientist for …

He's redefining green

Ambrose Carroll

Art: Nat Damm Ambrose Carroll Pastor, Renewal Worship Center Denver, Colo. The Renewal Worship Center, founded in April 2009 by Rev. Ambrose Carroll, 40, is one of the first churches in the U.S. to have started up with an explicitly environmental emphasis; it also has a mission to reach out to all different kinds of people, including struggling African Americans in the inner city. Its nonprofit arm, RENEWAL, focuses on green-job training and placement in the northeastern Denver area. Carroll is also coordinator of Denver’s Green Jobs Interfaith Coalition and has collaborated with other Denver clergy to call for strong …

actual earth day news (!)

Hey, look: Denver has a bike-sharing program

Courtesy B-cycleDenver today launches the nation’s largest bike-sharing program, distributing 500 bicycles at 50 stations around the city for citizens to use wherever they find them. The B-cycle program mirrors bike-sharing networks in Paris and Montreal, and it’ll be followed soon by networks in Boston and Minneapolis. Oh, and Mexico City too, which is launching a 1,114-bike program. The hope is that people can leave their car at home, take light rail or a bus into the city, and use the bikes to zip around. Participants can sign up at denver.bcycle.com, where they pay membership and usage fees. A 24-hour …

he's redefining green

Chandrasekhar “Spike” Narayan

Art: Nat Damm Chandrasekhar “Spike” Narayan Leader of Science and Technology Organization, IBM’s Almaden Research Center Silicon Valley, Calif. Spike Narayan and his team at IBM’s Almaden Research Center work on bleeding-edge technologies that are at the nexus of efforts to create a sustainable world—endlessly recyclable plastics, lithium-air batteries that could dramatically extend the range of electric cars, and infrastructure for smart cities. Given Narayan and the Almaden Research Center’s proximity to Silicon Valley venture capitalists and entrepreneurs, expect to see some of these technologies hit the market in the coming years.

he's redefining green

Jack Newman

Art: Nat Damm Jack Newman Cofounder and Senior Vice President of Research, Amyris Berkeley, Calif. He may look like an amiable Deadhead, but Jack Newman, 44—that would be Dr. Newman to you—is a Berkeley microbiologist who cofounded Amyris, a start-up that went from bioengineering a microbe to produce an anti-malarial drug to genetically tweaking a bug to excrete biodiesel (crazy, right?). Amyris, which has a pilot project under way in Brazil, is backed by high-profile Silicon Valley venture capitalists.

She's redefining green

Brenda Palms-Barber

Art: Nat Damm Brenda Palms-Barber Chief Executive Director, North Lawndale Employment Network Chicago, Ill. Brenda Palms-Barber never meant to start a green project. She just wanted to create jobs for the residents of Chicago’s North Lawndale neighborhood, 57 percent of whom have been incarcerated or had some involvement with the criminal justice system. As chief executive director of the North Lawndale Employment Network, she hatched the idea for Sweet Beginnings, an urban honey farming business that trains and employs locals who would otherwise have a hard time finding a job. In addition to selling honey, Sweet Beginnings produces the beeline brand of all-natural personal-care …

he's redefining green

Steve Price

Art: Nat Damm Steve Price Digital Designer, Urban Advantage El Cerrito, Calif. Digital artist Steve Price, 59, wants to show you the future of green urbanism—literally show you. He creates photo simulations of what blighted urban landscapes would look like if they were transformed into healthier, safer, more sustainable places—and pretty sweet spots to live. Price’s Berkeley firm, Urban Advantage, builds “photo-realistic visualizations” for developers, design firms, and local governments that want to show how walkable urban development could revitalize an area. “Everybody kind of nods and agrees and knits their brows as they listen to statistics and information about …

Double take

Fast food salads worse for you than KFC’s meaty Double Down

So you’re boycotting KFC because you think its extra-meaty Double Down sandwich (two chicken breasts, hold the buns) is nasty. But you’re running late and need food now. You opt for a healthy option at Burger King — a salad (the Tendercrisp Garden Salad, to be exact). Not so fast, McFoodie. The Consumerist has a list of 10 fast food items that are worse for you than the Double Down, and three of them happen to be faux-healthy salads.   The Double Down’s nutrition line is surprisingly low: 540 calories, 32 grams of fat, and 1,380 milligrams of sodium. Not surprisingly, …

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