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Articles by Sir Oolius

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  • Mood in the hood

    John Hofmeister, President of Shell Oil Company, was on Charlie Rose Tuesday night.

    About 22 minutes into the segment, he says the following [my own transcription]:

    If we don't drill more in this country, I am quite concerned about civil disturbances in our urban areas because of the price of fuel.

    ...

    I was meeting in Los Angeles with mayor Villaraigosa and I asked him a specific question because I lived there during the Rodney King civil disturbances. [I] said, "How is the mood in the hood based upon the price of gasoline compared to the mood in the hood at the time of the Rodney King disturbances?" He said it's threshold.

    Let us drill or those people will act all crazy again! You know how they can be when it comes to things like this.

    And they say environmentalists are alarmist.

  • Not looking good for ice shelf in the Antarctic

    ... over there:

    While the area of collapse involves 160 square miles at present, a large part of the 5,000-square-mile Wilkins Ice Shelf is now supported only by a narrow strip of ice between two islands, said CU-Boulder's Ted Scambos, lead scientist at NSIDC. "If there is a little bit more retreat, this last 'ice buttress' could collapse and we'd likely lose about half the total ice shelf area in the next few years."

  • Competitive Whining, er, Enterprise Institute bashes Gore with all they’ve got

    A short while ago, Sir Oolius received a fundraising email from the Competitive Enterprise Institute asking for donations to help them with their new raison d'etre: yelling "FU, Al Gore!" as loudly and as often as possible. The fruits of this effort are now upon us in the form of a national ad whining campaign:

    If carbon = life, then Al Gore ...

  • On the International Conference on Climate Change

    If only Congress would have signed on to the Manhattan Declaration years ago, we could have spent valuable resources wisely summarizing nonexistent reports, thereby avoiding the subprime crisis.