Mason Inman

Mason Inman is a journalist who specializes in reporting on science and the environment. He writes regularly for National Geographic News, Science, and New Scientist, and has reported from Bangladesh and Pakistan. He also writes a weekly roundup of climate and energy news for Duke University's Nicholas Institute for Environmental Policy Solutions called The Climate Post.

Oil

'The Quest' questioned

A read of Daniel Yergin's new book, The Quest, reveals holes in his arguments, mostly centered around his discussion of peak oil.

a walk through the week's climate news

The Climate Post: Trace radiation isn’t the only global fallout from Fukushima

As Japan’s nuclear disaster stretched into its second week, traces of radiation from the stricken power plants showed up in several U.S. states, and as far away as Iceland. With the reactors and uranium fuel rods still proving difficult to bring under control, the disaster could be the “death knell” for nuclear power, some analysts said. Countries around the world — from China to Germany — are taking a closer look at their nuclear plants and plans, while the U.S. intends to complete an initial review of its reactors within three months. Some are still arguing publicly for more nuclear, such as European Union Climate Commissioner Connie Hedegaard and …

a walk through the week's climate news

The Climate Post: The aftermath in Japan

Japan’s been through a lot in just one week.Photo: Matthew BradleyLast Friday, Japan was rocked by a magnitude 9.0 quake — its most powerful earthquake on record, and the strongest anywhere in the world in the past 140 years — with its epicenter off the coast, creating a 30-foot-high tsunami that swallowed up whole towns and killed more than 5,000 people. The tsunami waves knocked out the cooling systems at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in northern Japan, creating a nuclear disaster that has worsened over the days since the natural disaster struck. Two of the six reactors in the complex appear to have suffered partial meltdowns, releasing large amounts …

A WALK THROUGH THE WEEK'S CLIMATE NEWS

The Climate Post: While Congress debates climate science, China and Europe move ahead

This picture is out of date. The race begun long ago, but the guy on the right is still pacing around trying to decide whether he should start.Republicans are far more skeptical of “global warming” than of “climate change,” a study led by a University of Michigan psychologist found. Among Democrats, on the other hand, about 85 percent believe the planet is getting hotter and weather getting weirder, no matter which label you use. Meanwhile, in the U.S. Congress, hearings continued about a bill to block the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency from protecting the environment — specifically, “from promulgating any regulation concerning, taking …

A WALK THROUGH THE WEEK'S CLIMATE NEWS

The Climate Post: Rupert Murdoch’s media empire, including Fox News, goes carbon neutral

“Maybe climate change is a hoax, but my company is going to reduce its footprint anyway.”Photo: World Economic ForumAn email has linked Fox News to deliberately casting doubt on climate change, but their parent company — Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp — seems to take climate change very seriously. News Corp announced it is now carbon neutral, claiming it is no longer contributing to global warming. It’s no small feat for the huge company, which also owns the Wall Street Journal and Dow Jones. On the site for the company’s Global Energy Initiative, Murdoch never utters the words “climate change” or “global warming,” but he says: …

A walk through the week's climate news

The Climate Post: Tension over Middle East oil

Will Gaddafi sabotage Libya’s oil pipelines to spite protesters?Photo: Crethi PlethiOver the past week, the unrest in the Middle East deepened, with growing protests in Bahrain and Libya, and more draconian measures by the countries’ leaders to quash the opposition. Libya is a significant oil exporter, and the first member of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) to experience significant protests in recent months. The developments have roiled the oil markets, driving the price above $110 a barrel — the highest since the bubble-inflated peak burst in July 2008, after spiking to nearly $150 a barrel. It could …

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