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Makes total sense!

On the one hand, Bush and the Republicans say we're helpless to do anything about global warming until China and India act. On the other hand, the U.S. Export-Import Bank and the Overseas Private Investment Corp. are funneling billions in taxpayer dollars to huge corporations (think Halliburton and Bechtel) to help them construct carbon-intensive hard infrastructure projects: According to their own reports, the two agencies approved projects in recent years that annually emitted more than 125 million metric tons of CO2 -- the equivalent of putting 31.3 million new cars on the road or increasing U.S. carbon emissions by 2%, …

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Two, Four, Six, Eight, Why Do We Procrastinate?

Big Auto to host fuel-economy rallies in Midwestern cities Revved up over fuel-economy rules, Detroit's Big Three automakers and the United Auto Workers will hold rallies in Chicago and St. Louis this week and next. The demonstrations are a reaction against the U.S. Senate energy bill, passed in June, which would raise fuel economy for both cars and trucks to 35 miles per gallon by 2020; Big Auto is throwing its steely heft behind a lamer House fuel-economy bill, which would keep car and truck standards separate and make improvements more slowly. "This is a bottom line, food-on-the-table concern for …

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One economist says no

James Galbraith gets to the heart of the dilemma facing climate change economics: The market's real failure is that it allows for no signal from the future to the present, either from the conditions that will exist 30 years hence or from the people who will be alive and working then. The question becomes: Can we really create a market in which those far-off voices are effectively heard? He ponders the solution offered by mainstream economists, mainly carbon taxes and cap-and-trade systems, noting that they all rely on markets and competition. Then he directly questions whether that's the way to …

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More Murray

Yesterday the Washington Post ran a profile of Robert Murray, head of Murray Energy, owner of the Utah mine that recently collapsed and all around evil motherfvcker. I actually thought the story did a decent job of showing what an unhinged fruitcake Murray is, gibbering on about how "elites" who attack coal don't understand what it's like to work in a coal mine -- this from a guy who's spent his career battling unions and running mines with horrendous safety records. With friends like these ... But the story also let lots of Murray's claims -- about, say, electricity prices …

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The CEO of Ford Motor Co. …

.. wants a roughly $6-per-gallon tax on gas. That's the only way, he says, Americans will stop "demanding" gas-guzzling cars. No comment.

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YearlyKos: Meyerson and Stern

Watching Harold Meyerson (editor in chief of The American Prospect) and Andy Stern (head of SIEU) chat about ... stuff. Stern says of the 100 largest financial institutions in the world, 50 are countries and 50 are companies. He says all progressives are fighting against the same foes, these multinational corporations, and it's high time that they unite rather than confining themselves to silos (environmentalist, human rights advocate, union dude, etc.). That gets a big cheer. Also notes -- as I suspect many speakers will -- that we do not yet appreciate the speed and scale of changes taking place …

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Soros, Goldman Sachs financing destruction of Brazilian forests

Well, that whole beating George Bush thing in 2004 didn't work out, so now billionaire financier / Democratic fundraiser / anti-Communist crusader George Soros is back to his first love: making money -- apparently even when it comes at the expense of the planet. Sabrina Valle of the Washington Post is reporting that Soros is one of the biggest investors in growing sugarcane ethanol in the Brazilian cerrado, "a vast plateau where temperatures range from freezing to steaming hot and bushes and grasslands alternate with forests and the richest variety of flora of all the world's savannas." That could soon …

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For ten mil

Congrats to Treehugger, which was just purchased by the Discovery Channel for a cool $10 million.

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Ranking oil companies from evil to even more evil

Get pumped: Sierra has updated its guide to choosing the least-evil gas stations. And they've condensed it to fit in a handy travel-sized package: a rearview-mirror air freshener, which could not be more appropriate considering how gassy Americans are. (We consume some 400 million gallons of crudeness a day!) Below, the top eight oil companies ranked from evil to even more evil: Top of the Barrel BP Sunoco Middle of the Barrel Royal Dutch Shell Chevron Valero Energy Corporation Citgo Bottom of the Barrel ExxonMobil ConocoPhillips

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Interesting stuff on the hottest new green tech

I've been waiting for a good excuse to link to Earth2Tech, an interesting new project from internet legend Om Malik's GigaOm family of blogs. It's focused on clean tech startups, which as we all know are the hot new thing. I've also been waiting for a good excuse to post something about thin-film solar, which is hopping right now. Shell and Honda, which are big-timers in solar, both recently dropped their crystalline silicon programs and switch to full-time thin-film R&D. In the next two or three years we're going to see the introduction of some products that will eventually change …