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Check it out , starting tonight

Those of you who listen to public radio know that Marketplace Money from American Public Media has done some good sustainability coverage. This weekend, they're running a story that includes some tips from my monthly jobs column Remake a Living. Makes me feel all gristy inside. Check the local listings to find out when Marketplace Money airs in your area. Or you can listen online beginning tonight. The April 13 show will be there for a week before it heads off to the archives. Have a green weekend!

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When insurers get serious about climate change, EVERYBODY gets serious about climate change

United Services Automobile Association (USAA), a "most-admired" company in many different rankings, has decided not to insure multiple homes in FL for one policyholder -- the first step in what will eventually be the revolt of the insurance companies against climate denialists (and against Florida legislators who want policyholders in other states to share the costs of insuring the damages from more intense and frequent hurricane strikes). This is great news (unless you own multiple Florida homes). The insurance industry has long been the sleeping giant of climate policy response. A lot of very red states have a lot to …

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And another way forward.

On April Fool's Day, Grist ran a fake bit on how Wal-Mart had "pulled the plug" on much-ballyhooed green initiatives, including its plan to to become the nation's number-one organic grocer. "In the end, our customers value low prices more than sustainability, and at Wal-Mart, we listen to our customers," Wal-Mart's CEO (fictionally) said. As so often happens these days, fact may be leaping ahead of satire. BusinessWeek reported today that the retail behemoth "has backed off of aggressive plans to offer more organic foods." Wal-Mart itself tepidly denies its retreat from organic, claiming that its original plans to push …

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A new anti-Exxon?

ConocoPhillips steps up to the plate.

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Heads You Lose, Tails I Win

World Bank has been OKing illegal logging in the Congo, says Greenpeace study You've probably developed an immunity to scandal and outrage, but we'll keep plying you with it anyway: a two-year study by Greenpeace International has found that in the past three years, Congolese village chiefs have handed over vast expanses of the world's second-largest rainforest to European and U.S. logging companies in what some might call, um, uneven exchanges. African teak can bring in almost $8,000 per tree; in exchange for huge tracts of forest, tribes were offered simple buildings costing perhaps $20,000 -- which sometimes didn't materialize …

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An overview of environmental careers experiencing growth

"April is the cruelest month," T. S. Eliot wrote. Ha! What did he know? For environmental-job seekers in a host of fields, this April could almost be certified "cruelty free." In no particular order, here's a quick overview of green career areas experiencing growth right now: Wind Power and Solar Energy A 2007 report from Clean Edge predicts that wind-power revenues are expected to rise from $17.9 billion in 2006 to $60.8 billion in 2016. Solar-photovoltaic companies anticipate a similar steep increase from $15.6 billion last year to $69.3 billion nine years from now. Estimates from other analysts and associations …

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Corporatists overestimate environmental response costs every time

A friend sends an article from a legal publication that makes an important point about economists and other naysayers who insist that addressing global climate disruption will be too expensive. (Oddly, the same people always gassing on about boundless human potential when it comes to imagining new substitutes for depleting resources always forget to incorporate that creativity in their projections of the cost of fixing environmental problems.) A key excerpt (my emphasis): The most comprehensive review ever carried out on the economics of climate change, the just-released Stem Review on the Economics of Climate Change (available at sternreview.org.uk) suggests that …

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An interview with Duke Energy CEO Jim Rogers

Meet Jim Rogers, a great American paradox. He's the top gun at Duke Energy, a huge (and hugely polluting) power company; he's also one of the nation's most dogged advocates for federal regulation of greenhouse-gas emissions. Jim Rogers. Duke Energy operates smack in the heart of coal country in the Midwest and Southeast and derives 70 percent of its power from the dirtiest of all fossil fuels. Rogers knows full well that his company has a lot at stake when it comes to cleaning up carbon emissions -- which is why, he says, he wants to be on the vanguard …

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New Yorker article reminds you why you hate it

Stacy Mitchell did a bang-up job earlier this week of explaining why Wal-Mart and other big-box stores could never actually be green. But if you need a more wide-ranging reminder of Wal-Mart's deep and abiding loathsomeness, check out Jeffrey Goldberg's article in the latest New Yorker: "Selling Wal-Mart: Can the company co-opt liberals?" If you've been awake the past few years, you're already familiar with many of the criticisms, but they're neatly packaged up here with a big brown bow on top. Carl Pope of the Sierra Club, quoted toward the end of the article, sums up some of the …

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Say what?

CNN: Global warming "could create opportunities for pharmaceutical, chemical, biotech and healthcare companies, but present serious challenges for paper, agriculture, furniture, energy and the overall economy." Too bad for you suckers who invested in Overall Economy Inc.!