Skip to content Skip to site navigation

Green Jobs

Comments

David Roberts talks green jobs with EnergyNow! [VIDEO]

Last week, I sat down with the folks at EnergyNow! to discuss "green jobs" -- what we mean when we talk about them, how many there are or may be, and related questions. Here it is (note the freshly trimmed beard!): (My apologies to the Brookings Institute for calling it the "Brookings Institution.") More thoughts on green jobs here.

Comments

video

Detroit everyman uses DIY moxie to turn his town into a solar mecca

Dave Strenski, resident of Detroit exurb Ypsilanti, got it into his head that he would help the local food co-op reduce its bills by installing solar panels on its roof. And he didn't let his complete lack of experience with solar stand in the way. At this point, he's not only put solar on the roof of his co-op and four other buildings, he's also created his own system for monitoring its power output, and has turned his website into a hub for solar DIYers worldwide.

Comments

Plane flies 200 miles in two hours on just electricity

Pipistrel-USA's Taurus G4 won the NASA's CAFE Green Flight Challenge (top prize $1.35 million!) by flying 200 miles in under two hours, using an amount of electricity equivalent to less than two gallons of gas. Google sponsored the competition, which is supposed to stimulate the “electric plane industry.” Who even knew there was an electric plane industry? Well, with that kind of seed money, THERE IS NOW. Plug-in personal aircraft, here we come!

Comments

Green jobs by the numbers

Cross-posted from the Center for American Progress. This post was coauthored by Susan Lyon, special assistant for energy policy at the Center for American Progress, and Matthew Kasper, an intern with the energy team at American Progress. There's one thing we know for certain about green jobs: They are real, well-paid, and growing. The jobs that make up the clean energy economy are on the rise when jobs in many other sectors are slipping away or moving overseas. With 14 million unemployed Americans, they are a sign of hope in an otherwise stagnant economy. In terms of sheer growth, the …

Comments

Global investment in clean energy blowin' the hell up

Global total new investment in clean energy 2004-10 ($BN) Good news: clean energy investment is basically doing awesome. "Few, if any, sectors can point to such a robust and broadly-based growth during a tumultuous time in the world economy," says Nathaniel Bullard of Bloomberg New Energy Finance. Look at the numbers: Clean energy has not had a down year since the creation of major market support programmes in Germany, which began in 2004. The growth rate was nearly 50 percent in 2005 and 2006, and even remained high--19 percent--during the first year of the financial crisis (and had the crisis …

Comments

Attention, pundits: We have the makings of a serious U.S. solar program

In my last post, I noted the disdain U.S. elites feel for the grubby-but-necessary politics of clean energy deployment. It's all well and good to advocate for sweeping macroeconomic solutions to carbon pollution, but there are all sorts of proximate battles being fought on the ground today. They'd be easier to win if pundits like Fareed Zakaria would weigh in on the right side. As an illustration of what I'm talking about, let me describe three current projects that together could put the U.S. on course for a major solar expansion. SolarStrong Start with an announcement a few weeks ago …

Comments

Getting the facts straight on green jobs

Image: Climate ProgressCross-posted from Climate Progress. The past few weeks have seen a perfect storm of misinformation on green jobs: What they are, how many there are, how much they contribute to the economy. Many of those throwing numbers around have relied on one source, a recent report from the Brookings Institution, which worked with Battelle's Technology Partnership Practice to attempt to define, evaluate, and count green jobs as a part of the economy from 2003-2010. It is clear to those of us who have been deeply engaged in making the case for green jobs for years that the Brookings …

Comments

Over 100,000 Americans work in solar industry

A worker installs solar panels for the Oregon Department of Transportation.Photo: Oregon DOT Cross-posted from Climate Progress. This Thursday, Republicans in the House Oversight and Government Reform Committee are holding a hearing called "How Obama's Green Energy Agenda is Killing Jobs." Could they make their ideological opposition to clean energy any more clear? The Solyndra bankruptcy and subsequent layoff of 1,100 workers has given opponents a platform to rail on green jobs as some kind of fantasy -- even when the evidence suggests otherwise. Case in point: There are now 100,237 jobs in the American solar industry, according to preliminary …

Comments

What Solyndra didn't teach us about clean energy and job creation

I always find posts like this one by David Rotman in Technology Review puzzling. He says "the fundamental policy mistake that produced the Solyndra debacle" was that the 2009 stimulus bill "conflated two objectives: creating jobs and building a clean-energy infrastructure." It is true, as Rotman says, that laying the groundwork for a clean energy economy is a large-scale, long-term endeavor. It will require lots of investments -- in basic science, new infrastructure, etc. -- that won't pay dividends for years to come. It is also true that the whole point of economic stimulus is to be spent quickly, to …

Comments

Can green jobs save the day?

David Frum asks: "What exactly is a 'green' job?" His confusion arises from the fact that a number of disparate claims and arguments all get loosely joined under the rubric of green jobs. I want, in this post, to try to pick apart a few of those claims so we can discuss them with more precision and maybe get past the sloganeering that's surrounded the subject lately. First, though, I want to endorse what Matt Yglesias says here: [W]hen politicians want to talk about economic growth, they tend to talk about "jobs." Absolutely all politicians do this. When governors want …