Grist List

Food

They’re genetically modifying goats to create human breast milk substitute

You know that human breast milk is very important for babies’ development. (If you don’t know this, go ostentatiously bottle-feed a baby doll near a farmers market! It will be fun, I promise.) But for various reasons, sometimes new moms can’t breastfeed — they need medication that shows up in breast milk, for instance, or they just don’t produce enough. And this is where genetically engineered goats, uh … butt in.

What is this talking otter trying to tell us?

I never realized this before, but it turns out otters can talk, and furthermore they sound just like Ike from South Park. This one also seems mildly irked by human inability to comprehend her language. What is she trying to tell us?

Cities

Number of bees in Queens man’s yard exceeds population of Queens

New York legalized beekeeping in 2010, but that does not mean that it was cool with city officials when they discovered that a guy in Queens named Yi Gin Chen had 45 beehives in his yard, containing 3 million bees. That’s more bees than there are people who live in Queens.

Climate & Energy

Awesome commercial shows you how to harness a rude giant’s antisocial tendencies

This power company ad is the most charming and poignant commercial for renewables we've ever seen.

Cities

Stuck in traffic, cancer surgeon commandeers little girl’s bike to get to the hospital

The surgeon borrowed an 8-year-old's pink Schwinn and Disney princess helmet to make it to the operating table in time.

Cities

World’s biggest bus is 98 feet long and can fit 256 passengers

This monster of public transportation is actually three buses chained together into a sort of Vehicular Centipede. It’s nearly 100 feet long, fits 256 passengers, and — if you believe the institute that developed it — is no harder to drive than a regular 40-footer. So basically, it’s a subway train minus the complicated underground infrastructure. Even better, Buszilla is a hybrid that can go up to five miles on battery power alone. 

Climate & Energy

20-foot radioactive ant will make you pretty concerned about nuclear power

Nuclear power didn’t make this radioactive ant — art did. But the 20-foot insect, which is made out of beads of uranium glass, is not just a terrifying work of art, but a commentary on the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear meltdown. The ant is part of an installation called “What The Birds Knew,” by artists Ken and Julia Yonetani.

Cities

A single sticker turns your bus commute into a monster rampage

All the monster sticker needs is a window on a moving tram or bus. The goal: Move your head so that the monster eats the heads of people (or dogs) that you pass.

Threatened sea lions are being killed off to save threatened fish

This is a pretty complicated Sophie’s Choice-esque eco-problem brewing in the Columbia River at the base of the Bonneville Dam, in the Pacific Northwest. California sea lions are protected. But they eat Chinook salmon and steelhead, which are also protected. So, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has given the states of Washington and Oregon permission to kill the sea lions. Which is really sad, especially when you look at the picture of the thing and it’s so darn cute. 

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