Did you wake up this morning with an overwhelming sense of sadness, a feeling that there was a hole in your heart? You’re not alone.

The world officially said goodbye to an old friend.

On Thursday, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) announced that the past year’s El Niño was no more. The declaration comes a few weeks after Australia’s Bureau of Meteorology, the other big El Niño monitoring group, also declared it dead and gone.

Sea surface temperature anomalies in the tropical Pacific show the dissipation of El Niño.
Sea surface temperature anomalies in the tropical Pacific show the dissipation of El Niño. NOAA

That means ocean temperatures in the eastern tropical Pacific are now near normal. But they might not stay that way for long, as odds are pointing to a cooling in the region that could herald the arrival of a La Niña event later this fall.

But before we move on, let’s take a minute to reflect on the dearly departed El Niño of 2015-16. This El Niño was one of the strongest on record and made its fair share of headlines. Its impacts on the weather were vigorously dissected by countless news organizations, weather forecasters, and Twitter commenters.