Transportation

Transportation

Atlanta region heads to the polls to reject a massive transportation investment

We've looked into our crystal ball, and it doesn't look good.

Cities

Edible Bus Stop turns London transit routes into a network of community gardens

Obviously your first thought when you hear “edible bus stop” is “Stay away! It was built by witches!” (No? Just me?) But shockingly, the Edible Bus Stop project is not about luring children to bus stops by building them out of gingerbread. Instead, it’s about providing food to the community by turning bus stops into public gardens. The Edible Bus Stop began as “a guerrilla garden project” alongside a South London bus stop. A small strip of land was being offered up for sale, and a group of locals started growing things in it. The group’s founder, Mark Gilchrist, told …

Transportation

The best pictures of trucks inside trucks inside trucks

Here’s a kind of awesome way to get trucks off the road: put them inside trucks inside other trucks, like some kind of truck turducken. Turtrucken. It’s three, or four, or nine trucks for the carbon footprint of one! This picture came originally via Reddit, so there’s little context, other than that it was taken in England and there’s a relevant Simpsons reference: But England would not win a recursive truck contest. It’s China, apparently, that has mastered the art of turtrucken: Four’s better than three, obviously:

Transportation

These fruit-shaped bus shelters make public transit more delicious

Waiting for a bus is never the most fun part of a commute, but if you lived in Isahaya City, Japan, you could at least pretend you were some kind of magic bus-riding mouse in a fairy tale. Bus shelters in the city are sculpted and painted to look like giant fruit.

Cities

19th-century London had a train line just for dead people

Back in mid-19th century England, public transportation was popular enough that even dead people had their own railway. P. D. Smith writes: The London Necropolis Railway station was constructed by the London Necropolis & National Mausoleum Company, specifically to serve their Brookwood Cemetery, 25 miles away in Woking, Surrey. The Company’s logo was, somewhat ghoulishly, a skull and crossbones. The railway transported the deceased, in their coffins, to the cemetery, as well as some living people — the mourners headed to the cemetery for the funeral. In the late 19th century, the train ran every day, a “daily funeral express.” …

Cities

How easy is it to take public transit to work? Depends on where you live

An assessment of the top 100 metropolitan areas in the country finds that most jobs are accessible by transit – but the workers might not be.

Transportation

High-speed rail in America: It might possibly actually happen

Maybe. Possibly. But not for a long time. Unless you live in California, in which case it's a slightly less long time.

Transportation

Congress passes terrible transportation bill, hits the road

Final transportation bill is a major letdown for advocates of transit, bikes, and other car alternatives.

Transportation

Boxer blinks, OKs a train wreck of a transportation bill

After months of wrangling, the House and Senate have settled on a final transportation bill. It's not pretty.

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