New Zealand installed its first acoustic fish fence, designed to herd salmon smolt in the right direction during migration …

… Polish fishermen who obeyed a ban on cod will receive up to $11,000 in revenue lost, but those who defied the ban will face fines up to $7,500 …

… salmon returns for the year in Vancouver were called “dismal”

… for the first time, scientists were able to estimate how much a fin whale can swallow in one lunge for krill, finding that they engulf 2,900 cubic feet in a single gulp — the equivalent of the volume of a school bus. Measuring the amount is tricky, said one scientist, because “you can’t get whales to run on a treadmill in a laboratory” …

… three weeks after a ship that collided with a bridge dumped nearly 60,000 gallons of oil, Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger lifted a ban on crabbing and fishing in the San Francisco Bay …

… the first jetskier in Scotland was convicted of harrassing dolphins since it became a criminal offense in 1981. The 22-year-old was ordered to pay a £500 fine …

… according to its auditor, the European Union has no reliable count of how much fish it catches …

… the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service destroyed 718,000 Atlantic salmon eggs that were found to be infected with pancreatic necrosis …

… a World War II-era ship that was sunk off the coast of Texas in November to create an artificial reef tipped on its side, blocking its entrance to fish and divers alike …

… the stench of more than a hundred dead Olive Ridley sea turtles permeated a beach in the Gahirmatha Marine Sanctuary in India. The cause of death is unknown …

… an Australian was caught with 200 times the legal limit of abalone. He could face three months in prison …

… authorities in Australia reduced the quota for razorfish in an attempt to stem the population’s decline …

… and fishermen in the United Arab Emirates were caught selling an oyster known locally as “doch.” The nearly-extinct oyster is banned from sale, but is traded on the black market because of its alleged aphrodisiac effect.