Skip to content

Support climate news that matters

Reader support keeps our work free. Donate now, and all gifts get matched through May 31.

Help us raise $50,000 by the end of May.

35%
Donate now

Articles by Will Greenberg

Will Greenberg is an editorial fellow at Mother Jones in San Francisco.

Featured Article

St. Amant, Louisiana, U.S.

This story was originally published by Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

Global warming has dramatically increased the likelihood of type of torrential rainfall that flooded Louisiana last month, according to a new study by government and private sector scientists. Researchers working with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration found that the probability of such storms along the U.S. Gulf Coast had increased by at least 40 percent since 1900 — and may even have doubled — thanks to climate change.

In August, cities and towns in the southern part of Louisiana were submerged after intense rains led to devastating flooding, killing 13 people and damaging around 55,000 homes. Gov. John Bel Edwards (D) estimates the damage will cost more than $8.7 billion. The Red Cross declared it “the worst natural disaster to strike the United States” since Hurricane Sandy in 2012.

On Aug. 11 and 12, Baton Rouge was hit with 11.24 inches of rain. By Aug.14, much of the area was measuring the rain in feet. The storm ultimately dropped 7.1 trillion gallons of water on the state, according to a Capit... Read more

All Articles