There’s much more to come on Sandy, from us and others, but this image seems to summarize the moment.

That’s the John B Caddell, a 712-ton oil tanker built in 1941, resting comfortably on a road in Staten Island.

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The tanker wasn’t carrying any oil at the time, happily. But the sight of a massive oil-hauler left high and dry by the largest hurricane in the recorded history of the Eastern seaboard seems …  symbolic.

A report from the local ABC affiliate:
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