Jill Stein has a plan to win the presidency.

Her idea is almost genius in its simplicity. There are 43 million Americans with student debt, Stein tells me over the phone, and if every one of them cast their ballot for her — the one candidate who has promised to cancel their debt — she could get a plurality of the vote and win the general election. “Young people are discovering that they can check the Green box and reclaim their lives,” she says.

It’s a nice thought, especially now, when the average student with loans leaves school $30,000 in debt. But unfortunately for Stein, it’s not really true that 43 million votes would take the presidency. America, as anyone who voted for Al Gore in 2000 will remember, doesn’t elect presidents through a popular vote. We elect them through the Electoral College — and if no candidate gets a majority of electoral votes, the House of Representatives gets to pick the president. This is one of the many problems with our electoral process, Stein says — a system designed to discourage people from voting. She has a plan to fix that too.