The American Lung Association would like to remind you that air pollution is not only warming the planet, but it’s also bad for your health.

The group released their Agenda for Clean Air [PDF] on Wednesday with a coalition of environmental groups, including Clean Air Watch. The report comes just a day after the association and environmentalists scored a big win on ambient air quality, as an appeals court directed the EPA to review and reconsider their 2006 particulate matter standards.

“Last night the president spoke elequently about the ravages of climate change and the need to take action,” said Clean Air Watch President (and Grist contributor) Frank O’Donnell on a press call rolling out the agenda. “We are here today to remind you there are other ravages caused by the noxious fumes that come out of America’s smokestacks and tailpipes. Tens of millions of Americans still live in areas with dirty air, air that makes them sick, air that shortens their lives.”

American Lung Association Vice President Janice Nolan echoed similar concern that climate change is getting all the attention when it comes to emissions. “We see that there is a movement in this country to deal with the environment, to deal with climate change, and we applaud that. But we also see that dealing with those things does not necessarily mean that we effectively deal with air pollution,” said Nolan. “Solutions are possible that help us address all of them.”

The broad points of their agenda:

  • Reduce emissions from coal-fired power plants and prevent major new power plants and factories from making air quality worse.
  • Clean up ocean-going vessels, existing fleets of dirty diesel vehicles and heavy equipment, cars, light trucks, and SUVs.
  • Impose emissions standards on factory farms.
  • Protect national parks and forests from pollution from nearby development.
  • Prevent increases in air pollution from alternative energy choices.
  • Increase and improve enforcement of Clean air regulations.
  • Restore scientific integrity to the standard-setting process, and strengthen ozone and particulate standards.
  • Improve the clean air infrastructure by improving the monitoring network and increasing federal grants for state and local air pollution work.

More on the agenda is available on their website. The environmental partners signing on to the report:

Appalachian Mountain Club
Chesapeake Bay Foundation
Clean Air Task Force
Clean Air Watch
Earthjustice
Environmental Defense Fund
Environmental Integrity Project
National Parks Conservation Association
Natural Resources Defense Council