Lori Rotenberk

Lori Rotenberk is a Chicago-based journalist whose work has appeared in the New York Times, The Boston Globe, Chicago Wilderness Magazine, and the Chicago Sun-Times. She is also also wild about nature. Follow her on Twitter.

Food

Finding the magic and manure in one family’s farming chronicles

The Brockman family writes about the challenges of the seasons, the hard realities of farming organically, and the turmoil of climate change.

barnstorm

These old barns are good for more than reclaimed wood and weddings

Around the country, classic, crumbling farm buildings are being spruced up and put back to work by a new generation of sustainable farmers.

Climate & Energy

Teaching kids about climate change? Read them a classic story

Skip the lectures and the horror stories, says one environmental science prof, and just help them fall in love with nature.

Cellar's market

A growing appetite for local food sends us back to our root cellars

Don’t want to buy carrots grown in Timbuktu? Good news: Local farmers may have a few tucked away underground.

Living

Up the creek by pedal power: An Englishman bikes the Hudson Valley

Nick Hand rode 500 miles from Manhattan to Hudson Falls, following Pete Seeger's "dirty stream," interviewing and photographing working people along the way.

Living

Man of the cloth: Zace the Great grows organic, heirloom veggies — and blue jeans

On a farm in the hills of Ohio, 36-year-old Zachary Myers has built a cottage industry on vintage denim.

Cities

When it comes to climate change, this artist lets the trees do the talking

Chicago’s newest urban renewal project will let people watch the slow-motion calamity of climate change -- by way of tree blossoms.

Cities

Chicago turns “the Ol’ Pisspot” into a watery urban playground

Once a backwater filled with unspeakable yuck, the Chicago River is now a model of how cities can right past wrongs, for everyone’s benefit.

Food

Drift catchers use citizen science to fight pesticide pollution

Tired of watching chemicals blow across their fields, withering crops and threatening their own health, some farmers are taking matters into their own hands.

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